Social Media

Social Storytelling Made Simple

Jun 25, 2016

Snaps, tweets, Instas and Vines.

These staples of millennial communication can be exciting yet confusing tools for journalism. At PRNDI’s "Social Storytelling" breakout session, social media gurus gave a crash course on the trendiest tools, such as Snapchat and Facebook Live.

Kelly Moffitt, online producer at St. Louis Public Radio; Adam Ragusea, host of Current’s The Pub podcast; and Lori Todd, social media editor at NPR, moderated the panel.

Social Media Worth Spreading

Jun 27, 2015
Got Credit

The room was full of Baby Boomers, Gen Xers and Millennials during the social media session that opened up PRNDI's main conference in Salt Lake City this year. Some tapped away on their smartphones while others scribbled with pen and paper. Bottom line, all of them were taking notes and posting about the tool many of us tend to underestimate: social media.

Flickr: MarkGuitarPhoto

When it comes to media, a lot has stayed the same, but a lot has changed, too. Amy Mitchell, the Director of Journalism Research at the Pew Research Center, gave the keynote address at the PRNDI conference this year. She titled her talk "The State of the News Media." In her presentation, she tracked the trajectory of traditional and digital media in the United States.

Here are some of the highlights: 

1. More Media-Makers, Sharper Focus

There are currently 5,000 full-time staff and editorial positions at nearly 500 digital news outlets (30 larger sites and 468 smaller ones). Two areas where these outlets are investing much of their focus are investigative and international coverage. Sites like Propublica and Buzzfeed are cornering the market. Propublica is utilizing data-driven coverage to engage their audience and Buzzfeed is preparing to open offices in Berlin, Tokyo, Mumbai and Mexico. While digital media outlets are major producers, they still account for a small percentage of media producers. Traditional media lost 16,200 jobs from 2003 to 2012 but it has also retained 38,000 full-time editorial newspaper employees.