#PRNDI14

And Now... Your 2013 PRNDI Award Winners!

Jun 23, 2014
The PRNDI14 Press Corps and Scholarship Winners Ann Pierret, Kayla Reed, and Sayre Quevedo, with their editor Erin Hennessey.
Amy Jeffries / PRNDI

The 2013 PRNDI Awards were distributed at the annual conference in Washington, DC on June 21, 2014. NPR's Audie Cornish was the Master of Ceremonies, but radio journalism from member stations was the star. 

Anatomy of an NPR Newscast

Jun 21, 2014
Renée Johnson

Putting together an NPR newscast takes at least a four person team - anchor/reporter, tape cutter, producer and editor. At PRNDI's "Newscasting NPR-Style" session, we heard from four NPR anchors and an executive producer about how they each contribute to the final product. 

NPR's executive producer, Robert Garcia, moderated the panel of anchors, including Korva Coleman, Lakshmi Singh, Jamie McIntyre and Jack Speer. Garcia showcased one anchor at a time. He played one of the anchors' best newscasts before letting the audience Q&A from them.

Listen First: The Key to a Good Edit

Jun 17, 2014

Every edit NPR Western Editor Jason DeRose does begins with him listening to the reporter read the story aloud while he/she plays the actualities on tape. "Each piece has to work as radio," DeRose says. It's important to remember that the listener will not have the reporter's script in front of them. 

During a "first edit," DeRose listens and times the story, but he says that he's also thinking of his emotional response. This leads to the "macro edit", during which he addresses problems with the structure, narrative, flow, fairness and/or balance. When it comes to actualities, DeRose says, "Keep people together, don't bounce around with your sources."

After what should be no more than a 15-minute edit, the reporter is expected to spend the next hour re-working their piece. 

DeRose demonstrated a first edit in front of a live audience members during a session at the PRNDI conference in Washington, DC. Deena Prichep, a freelancer based in Portland, OR called in with her story on raw milk.

Developing Special Projects: Think 'Audience First'

Jun 17, 2014
Marc Cornelis

In planning your next special project, think about your audience before you begin. In the PRNDI session "Thinking Audience for Your Next Big Thing," NPR Digital Service's Kim Perry and Eric Athas shared their 'user story' model and how two stations are already putting it into practice. 

KCUR and Vermont's VPR are using the model to attack the issues of a divided city and a state's drug problem. 

KCUR's focus on the stigma surrounding the eastern part of Kansas City has resulted in a community engagement team and a Tumblr page specific to the area. Donna Vestal, the station's Director of Content Strategy, says this has helped the reporters realize the stories they want to do may not be what their audience wants to hear.

Covering Congress: Watch Dog the Lawmakers

Jun 17, 2014
Andy Withers

Why does covering Congress matter? Here's how Todd Zwillich, Washington correspondent for "The Takeaway" answers that question:  "Lack of (civic) engagement is the corrupt politician's most powerful tool." In other words, if the media don't keep an eye on the people's business, it's good news for those who want to sneak through corrupt agendas. 

Zwillich joined NPR Congressional reporter Ailsa Chang and Matt Laslo, who files stories about Congress for NPR and 40 of its member stations, for a lively PRNDI session on "Covering Congress."